Author Topic: Kepler probe  (Read 2823 times)

Offline darkfizzikcowboy

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Kepler probe
« on: May 15, 2013, 03:47:28 PM »
According to a NASA update on their website the Kepler probe suffered a failure in one of the probes steering mechanisms. The probe will be unable to have fine steering controls to detect deep space exoplanet candidates. The Kepler team is still working on what the probe will be able to do in its mission.
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Offline bn

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2013, 04:58:56 PM »
oh noooo.

I'm sure they'll work something out.
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Offline scikopas

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2013, 05:37:51 PM »
I think the kepler team has done a pretty darn good job of detecting exoplanets already. so even if they cant continue the original mission, there was a lot of really great science done.
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Offline darkfizzikcowboy

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2013, 05:51:44 PM »
The Kepler probe and the Kepler Team  has accomplished a lot and did exceed the original 3 1/2 year mission. I'm sure something will get figured out but the loss of the science will be missed.
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Offline stephako

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2013, 01:44:35 PM »
oh that is sad. But I guess they still have truckloads of data to analyze
So the next earth with diamond covered beaches may yet be discovered  ;D
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Offline CthulhuKid

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2013, 08:28:05 AM »
I read about a new telescope that supposed to be going up in a decade or so that is supposed to do the same thing that Keplar did, but on a wider swath of sky and for stars that were closer by.

I read it in this month's Scientific American, but I'm not finding it on their site, or on NASA.gov.  Maybe it's a European satellite.  Aw hell, I'll have to go look it up.  But the long and short of it is that it will be good enough to spot atmospheres on exoplanets, but just shy of finding signs of biology on said planets.  Great stuff.

Offline scikopas

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2013, 09:09:03 AM »
But the long and short of it is that it will be good enough to spot atmospheres on exoplanets, but just shy of finding signs of biology on said planets.

woah thats pretty amazing, I hadn't heard that before.  I wonder what cool techniques they'll use to get that information.  I thought kepler only used star wobble and transition dimming, which really just tells us period, size, and number of planets in the plane. I can't see how those could really give us atmospheres.
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Offline CthulhuKid

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2013, 10:06:44 AM »
If I remember right, it only detects them through transitions, and from that can see how the light changes as it passes through the atmosphere.  I guess since it'll be more sensitive than Kepler and looking at closer stars, the ability to make out the difference between star light and star light that traveled through a planet's atmosphere is possible.

Making note to find article when I get home...

Offline CthulhuKid

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Re: Kepler probe
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2013, 06:29:04 PM »
Aaaand after a much needed build up, I found the article.  I was wrong on most of the major points since it talks about a DIFFERENT telescope halfway through, but it's still interesting.

From Scientific American, June 2013

Titled "Closer to Home" by John Matson

It doesn't appear to be available on the website, but I'll sum up some cool things using what I can without breaking copyright law:
...
The new telescope is called TESS - Transisting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, NASA had green-lit for 2017 launch at a cost of $200 million.
....
"Altogether we'll examine about half a million stars," says TESS principal investigator George R. Ricker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology astrophysicist.
....
"Around the time that TESS compiles a list of nearby exoplanets at the end of its two-year baseline mission, astronomers may have a powerful new eye in the sky..." namely the James Webb Space Telescope.
.....
[So I guess they'll find earth sized exoplanets using TESS, then really look at 'em with the JWST and see their atmospheres.]
...
"we can almost see biogenetic signatures, but not quite," Ricker says.  "That could well take a next-generation space instrument to do that."
....
--------------------
So I was only half right.  Ah well.