Author Topic: Ep. 12 - Planned obsolescence / Brainstorm: 3D Printing uses  (Read 2193 times)

Offline Tragic Story

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Ep. 12 - Planned obsolescence / Brainstorm: 3D Printing uses
« on: November 17, 2013, 07:26:33 AM »
Discuss!

To get the ball rolling:

Planned obsolescence - A great case was made as to why this is "false" in the podcast.  However, a point not taken into account is the fact that the "expected life rate" of an item is never stated to the consumer.  While test groups may say "for X dollars, I expect Y hours of use time" the product never displays/advertises this fact.  How can a consumer know how long a product will last him?  If it fails before his expectations is that "planned obsolescence" in his eyes?

3D Printing:  What would you print? I posted this on the Facebook page but am re posting it here:  This is what I think will make 3D printing get in homes:

"Just adding to the brainstorm by suggesting that one of the best uses for a 3D printer will be to print out your awards/trophies/achievements when playing video games.

For example, say you get 100 kills in Battlefield 4, in addition to having the special dog tag avatar, you get a 3D CAD drawing of the dog tag emailed to the account registered with the game so you can print it and show off your leet skills to everyone in real life.

Or if you have the fastest lap on Dirt 4 this month, you get emailed a drawing of the car you drove to get it. Or maybe the top down view of the track with your name & time on it."
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Offline Tragic Story

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Re: Ep. 12 - Planned obsolescence / Brainstorm: 3D Printing uses
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2014, 06:41:34 AM »
Well, at CES yesterday, they unveiled a new use of 3D printing not thought of.  Edible 3D printing.

http://www.nasdaq.com/press-release/photo-release--3d-systems-introduces-worlds-first-certified-kitchenready-chefjet-3d-printers-20140107-00603

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Offline scikopas

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Re: Ep. 12 - Planned obsolescence / Brainstorm: 3D Printing uses
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2014, 11:04:29 AM »
Thats really neat; similar idea to the giant modified inkjet printers they use to print pizzas and food-safe dyes on cakes and stuff.   

Is anyone on the forums at CES?  I haven't been in a few years, but its really neat to see all the sweet prototypes and new products.  I just wish they had some engineers there sometimes instead of just marketers.  I had an "engineer" namebadge, and when I spoke to people at booths they would look at my badge and basically just ignore me. Very different experience from my buddy who had a sales/procurement namebadge.
PhD student in Materials Science at Arizona State University currently working on high-temperature superconductors and quantum computers or something.
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Offline Slugsie

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Re: Ep. 12 - Planned obsolescence / Brainstorm: 3D Printing uses
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2014, 01:27:16 PM »
I'm fairly new to the podcast, so I'm currently working through the back issues, and having a great time whilst doing it.

I recently listened to episode 12, and the discussion about 3D printers, especially the discussion on their use by kids to create toys. Jacob and Joe briefly pondered about what sort of software tool would be simple enough for a child to use, yet produce interesting and varied enough possibilities that the user could create something that was almost guaranteed to be unique. This immediately had me thinking back to a game from a few years ago that promised much but failed to deliver on most of it - Spore. By far the best part of this game was the creature creator. You could pick and choose amongst a variety of body parts - arms, legs, hands, feet, mouths etc, place them on your creature, resize to your hearts content, and voila you had your creature. It was simple to use and produced great results. I just checked and it appears that it's possible to export your creations into the 3D modelling tool Maya, and then out to an STL that you can print... so there you go. Just need to get the team behind Spore to make the creature creator stand alone, and link to a 3D printer with a little more ease. None of that would be hard I reckon.

Keep up the podcast, I'm loving getting my Engineering on!

Offline Ed Lolington

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Re: Ep. 12 - Planned obsolescence / Brainstorm: 3D Printing uses
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2014, 12:09:59 PM »
I'm fairly new to the podcast, so I'm currently working through the back issues, and having a great time whilst doing it.

I recently listened to episode 12, and the discussion about 3D printers, especially the discussion on their use by kids to create toys. Jacob and Joe briefly pondered about what sort of software tool would be simple enough for a child to use, yet produce interesting and varied enough possibilities that the user could create something that was almost guaranteed to be unique. This immediately had me thinking back to a game from a few years ago that promised much but failed to deliver on most of it - Spore. By far the best part of this game was the creature creator. You could pick and choose amongst a variety of body parts - arms, legs, hands, feet, mouths etc, place them on your creature, resize to your hearts content, and voila you had your creature. It was simple to use and produced great results. I just checked and it appears that it's possible to export your creations into the 3D modelling tool Maya, and then out to an STL that you can print... so there you go. Just need to get the team behind Spore to make the creature creator stand alone, and link to a 3D printer with a little more ease. None of that would be hard I reckon.

Keep up the podcast, I'm loving getting my Engineering on!

That's pretty awesome. I never played Spore, but printing out characters from games is a neat idea.